Wednesday, September 16, 2015

Waiting On Wednesday: The Bazaar of Bad Dreams by Stephen King

"Waiting On" Wednesday is a weekly event, hosted by Jill over at Breaking the Spine, that spotlights upcoming releases that we're eagerly anticipating.

The Bazaar of Bad Dreams by Stephen King
Expected publication: November 3rd 2015 by Scribner

A master storyteller at his best—the O. Henry Prize winner Stephen King delivers a generous collection of stories, several of them brand-new, featuring revelatory autobiographical comments on when, why, and how he came to write (or rewrite) each story.

Since his first collection, Nightshift, published thirty-five years ago, Stephen King has dazzled readers with his genius as a writer of short fiction. In this new collection he assembles, for the first time, recent stories that have never been published in a book. He introduces each with a passage about its origins or his motivations for writing it.

There are thrilling connections between stories; themes of morality, the afterlife, guilt, what we would do differently if we could see into the future or correct the mistakes of the past. “Afterlife” is about a man who died of colon cancer and keeps reliving the same life, repeating his mistakes over and over again. Several stories feature characters at the end of life, revisiting their crimes and misdemeanors. Other stories address what happens when someone discovers that he has supernatural powers—the columnist who kills people by writing their obituaries in “Obits;” the old judge in “The Dune” who, as a boy, canoed to a deserted island and saw names written in the sand, the names of people who then died in freak accidents. In “Morality,” King looks at how a marriage and two lives fall apart after the wife and husband enter into what seems, at first, a devil’s pact they can win.

Magnificent, eerie, utterly compelling, these stories comprise one of King’s finest gifts to his constant reader—“I made them especially for you,” says King. “Feel free to examine them, but please be careful. The best of them have teeth.”


As much as I like his classic doorstoppers, there's no doubt that King is at his finest when he's focused. His short stories and novellas are some of his best work, so I'm always keen to see a new collection. Some day, I would love to land an ARC of his work, but the fact is he doesn't really need my help. Not that I'll ever stop hoping! :)

9 comments:

  1. I've read Nightshift and one of his full length novels. I prefer him in the smaller doses. This one I would read.

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  2. OOh nice! I don't think I've ever really read one of his books. I read a novella once years ago, but that's about it! His stuff usually terrifies me! LOL!

    Here's my WoW

    Have a GREAT day!

    Old Follower :)

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  3. As usual, it's a King so I gotta have it. I love the cover.

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  4. Very cool, I was just having a conversation about Stephen King the other day about how I love his work but his books can demand a lot of investment because they're so darn long. I should really look into his short fiction and novellas, never read any of them, not counting stuff like The Green Mile or Hearts in Atlantis.

    ~Mogsy @ BiblioSanctum

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  5. So cool, I do love this creepy cover too. I love SK's short stories, although I'm quite fond of his door-stoppers too.

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  6. Every time I hear King is releasing a new book, it automatically goes to the top of my most anticipated list :)

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  7. I didn't know that he had a new book to be released that soon, I'm curious. I love the cover

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  8. There have certainly been some classic short stories from Stephen King. I LOVED Quitter's Inc and the one with the ledge that also made it into the Cat's Eye film. Great stuff!

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  9. The scariest book I have ever read was King's "It", which had over 1,000 pages. You could tell he put a lot of himself into that novel, and that human element made it more terrifying. I wouldn't be so broad to say his short stories were his best work (Lawnmower man comes to mind), but I've never been truly disappointed. I am particularly excited about the introductory passages, his insight into writing is fantastic.

    - Sam

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